Owing to the fact that that the process of fermentation has begun, the juice increases its volume. Ad Choices. You simply heat up the juice to just below boiling. Most people have immune systems strong enough to handle small amounts of bacteria, such as in unpasteurized or "raw" juice. If in doubt, ask the seller before deciding to buy and drink the juice. To contact an expert in your area, visit https://extension.msu.edu/experts, or call 888-MSUE4MI (888-678-3464). Due to USDA regulations regarding safe cheese production, some varieties of unpasteurized cheese are processed abroad and cannot be imported to the United States. Unpasteurized Juice and Its Safety There is nothing like having a big glass of freshly squeezed fruit juice as a part of a healthy and nutritious breakfast. Pasteurizing is a fairly simple process. However, unpasteurized juice has a greater risk of contamination by pathogenic microorganisms. By contrast, today’s beverages have a long shelf life thanks to the pasteurization process, named for the nineteenth century French scientist Louis Pasteur. Now the question is arisen that Is it bacteria or germs free? This is the time of year for fresh apples, juice and cider. Orange juice as collected from the squeezing process, despite being kept refrigerated before sale, and despite being fairly acidic, will not resist indefinitely the growth of bacteria. When fruits and vegetables are made into fresh-squeezed juice, harmful bacteria may be present and become part of the finished product. Published reports indicate that over 95% of the juice consumed by Americans each year is pasteurized. These are normally found in the refrigerated sections of grocery stores, health-food stores, cider mills, or farm markets. Both pasteurized and unpasteurized juices will be available at grocery stores, farmers markets and roadside stands. Rcsm Mahavidhalay | Home; About us. Unpasteurized Fruit/Vegetable Juices and Ciders: A Potential Health Risk What is the difference between pasteurized and unpasteurized juice? Some people find that pasteurization changes the flavor, but it has little effect on nutrients. “Pasteurization is crucial,” Felicia Wu, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Michigan State University, tells SELF. And they come with more risks. Unpasteurized juices have a short shelf life of only a few days. The unpasteurized or untreated juice is often referred to as “natural juice”. And there could be something to that. The 4-H Name and Emblem have special protections from Congress, protected by code 18 USC 707. These typically unpasteurized juice products are found at farmers' markets, local orchards, cider mills, roadside stands and juice bars, but they may also be available at local grocery stores and supermarkets. Bacteria would not have as long a time to proliferate, and smaller batches, food code requirements for cleaning and sanitizing the produce, and short storage times can help reduce your risk, he explains. All raw, unpasteurized juice must include this disclaimer, worded exactly as below: “WARNING: This product is not pasteurized and, therefore may contain harmful bacteria that can cause serious illness in children, the elderly, and persons with weakened immune systems.” Because juicing fans aren’t talking about swigging the juices you typically find on grocery stores shelves. How do I reduce the risk of illness? Most juice in the United States is pasteurized to kill harmful bacteria. Unpasteurized packaged juice must be labeled with a warning that says: "This product has not been pasteurized and therefore may contain harmful bacteria that can cause serious illness in children, the elderly, and persons with weakened immune systems." Unpasteurized juice may contain harmful bacteria that could make some people sick. Orange juice as collected from the squeezing process, despite being kept refrigerated before sale, and despite being fairly acidic, will not resist indefinitely the growth of bacteria. Little pricey compare than pasteurized juice.